Technology

Top Video Editing Software for Linux

It is no secret in today’s time and age  where visual media and subject matter rule the roost when it comes to the field of content creation. It has been long since  proved  that audiences react far more and better to imagery and visual content rather than content that is presented in plain text. And in the realm of visual content itself, it is the language of motion pictures and videos that have reigned supreme over the rest. Therefore, it is only logical that today’s leading content creators and brands are increasingly focused on churning out top-notch video content with the help of leading applications like InVideo for their prominent advertising and brand messaging campaigns.

Thus, it becomes highly essential for these people to narrow in on the best crop of video editing softwares available out there. After all, visualizing and composing good video content is only half the job done. The other half lies in the successful presentation and effective editing of the said content. Only then will the final output have the potential to create the desired impact on its viewer that it is intended to in the first place. Keeping in mind the importance of this process, the following segment has been written to shed some light on the best free video editing softwares for Linux.

Kdenlive:

An open-source and online video editor, Kdenlive is the best tool for beginners who want to grasp video editing fundamentals. It has no recognized paid version to date.

Features:

  • User-friendly interface.
  • Highly navigable development space.
  • Multi-track video editing feature that allows users to integrate several disparate footages into one coherent output.
  • Its coterie of effects and transitions helps the user achieve the desired result in their final output.
  • It supports a wide range of file formats hailing from a diverse spectrum of cameras and camcorders makes it all the handier.

Pros:

  • Not complicated.
  • Fit for all purposes.

Cons:

  • KDE applications are subject to
  • getting bloated.
  • Will not give you industry-grade output.

OpenShot:

As a multipurpose video editing tool, OpenShot is widely recognized for its cross-platform computability. Openshot is free to use and has no paid version.

Features:

  • Users can export and manipulate the same file on all operating systems, including Linux, Windows, and macOS.
  • Its powerful curve-based keyframe animations, coupled with its video transitions that allow for real-time previews, makes it the software of choice among many seasoned editors.
  • OpenShot proves to be a highly convenient tool when it comes to carrying out image overlays and composting operations.

Pros:

  • Cross-platform compatibility.
  • Highly effective Facebook video editor.

Cons:

  • Does not give a finished output like a professional-grade editing software.
  • May prove difficult to use for first-time users.

Shotcut:

Among other free video editing softwares for Linux, Shotcut is highly popular, for it lets the user take a step ahead and dabble in the realm of high-resolution 4k videos. Shotcut does not have a paid version.

Features:

  • Supports a host of video and audio formats.
  • It also lends support towards hosting an external monitor.
  • Shotcut is best known for its native timeline editing feature and facilitates a smooth mix and match of resolutions and frame rates within a project.
  • It is the software of choice for basic video editing projects due to the unlimited undo and redo for playlist edits that it accords to its users.

Pros:

  • Lets you work with high-resolution videos.
  • The native timeline editing feature.

Cons:

  • Complex navigation owing to a vast number of features.
  • Not user-friendly for amateur video editors.

Flowblade:

Flowblade is a free video editing software for Linux garners attention for its stylized and highly modern-looking user interface. Flowblade has no recognized paid version to date.

Features:

  • Multi-track editing.
  • It allows for the manipulation of non-linear footage and makes it a high utility tool in the process.
  • Highly fast and increasingly precise.
  • Scripted in Python, which makes way for high levels of optimization and perfection.

Pros:

  • Exclusively available for Linux alone.
  • Supports proxy editing and is a great lightweight application that executes tasks like batch rendering and video splitting and merging with sufficient ease.

Cons:

  • Unavailable on other platforms.
  • Not suitable for intensive projects.

InVideo:

For users looking for free video editing softwares for Linux that is a notch above the basic ones and packs more features with them, InVideo is the answer. InVideo comes in two versions– InVideo Free and InVideo Pro. The latter comes at a monthly subscription model at around $20per month.

Features:

  • People transitioning from simple video editing projects to slightly complicated ones can use Lightworks as the perfect bridging software.
  • It allows for non-linear video editing besides supporting high-resolution videos that include 4k, SD, and HD formats.
  • User-friendly and highly intuitive user interface.
  • Easy timeline editing and trimming feature.
  • Drag and drop support.

Pros:

  • Professional-grade video editing software.
  • Has a wide variety of features.

Cons:

  • The free version, Lightworks Free, has limited features.

Blender:

Blender, as a free video editing software for Linux, is mostly a tool of choice for those who primarily deal with 3D objects and projects. The software has no paid version.

Features:

  • It is a highly professional, industry-grade tool and has been used actively in the production of several popular Hollywood movies.
  • Even though it was originally designed for 3D modeling, Blender ended up being used as a powerful video editing software as well.
  • It packs features such as luma waveform and chroma vectorscope that gives budding 3D project enthusiasts a handy gateway into other detailed and well-structured projects.

Pros:

  • Allows you to dabble with 3D projects.
  • Cross-platform compatibility.

Cons:

  • Complicated for new users and amateur video editors.
  • May prove to be unfit for other general projects that do not involve 3D.

Conclusion:

It goes without saying that there is no shortage of either quality or quantity when it comes to scouting for free video editing softwares for Linux in the market. In such a situation, creators visit here to create quality videos. It becomes highly essential for users to identify their own needs and project objectives so that they can effectively narrow in on software that best solved their problem statement and accords them the maximum creative liberty in the entire process.


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